noBel 

nobelnewsletteratura newsnobelnewsletteraturanewsnobelnews


1  - 
STORIA & winners

2  -  EVENTI LETTERARI

3  -  NEWS & ALTRO

 

2004/5/6  -  2007  -  2008/9/10  -  2011  -  2012   -  2013  -  2014  -   2015  -   2016  -  2017  -  NOBEL LETTERATURA
 

.  NOBEL LETTERATURA 2017

KAZUO ISHIGURO


8 NOVEMBRE 1954 - Nagasaki  - JAPAN

 

who, in novels of great emotional force
has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world

nei suoi romanzi di grande forza emotiva - si legge nella motivazione - ha scoperto l’abisso sottostante il nostro illusorio senso di connessione con il mondo
          

https://youtu.be/yzfgCqwCvVo   -  https://youtu.be/CX1IKNnePAk    -   facebook.com/nobelprize/videos

https://youtu.be/YqDUstHYx4Q  -  Being a novelist has been a good second choice (career) - ki

 

Somewhere in the back of my mind, I’m still a singer-songwriter
facebook.com/nobelprize/videos

 

...

 

My Twentieth Century Evening – and Other Small Breakthroughs
If you'd come across me in the autumn of 1979, you might have had some difficulty placing me, socially or even racially
.   I was then 24 years old .  My features would have looked Japanese, but unlike most Japanese men seen in Britain in those days, I had hair down to my s houlders, and a drooping bandit-style moustache .  The only accent discernible in my speech was that of someone brought up in the southern counties of England, inflected at times by the languid, already dated vernacular of the Hippie era. If we'd got talking, we might have discussed the Total Footballers of Holland, or Bob Dylan's latest album, or perhaps the year I'd just spent working with homeless people in London  .   Had you mentioned Japan, asked me about its culture, you might even have detected a trace of impatience enter my manner as I declared my ignorance on the grounds that I hadn't set foot in that country – not even for a holiday – since leaving it at the age of five.
...

So here I am, a man in my sixties, rubbing my eyes and trying to discern the outlines, out there in the mist, to this world I didn't suspect even existed until yesterday .   Can I, a tired author, from an intellectually tired generation, now find the energy to look at this unfamiliar place ?   Do I have something left that might help to provide perspective, to bring emotional layers to the arguments, fights and wars that will come as societies struggle to adjust to huge changes ?
I'll have to carry on and do the best I can … But I'll be looking to the writers from the younger generations to inspire and lead us. This is their era, and they will have the knowledge and instinct about it that I will lack .
In the worlds of books, cinema, TV and theatre I see today adventurous, exciting talents: women and men in their forties, thirties and twenties .

So I am optimistic  .   Why shouldn't I be ?

But let me finish by making an appeal – if you like, my Nobel appeal! It's hard to put the whole world to rights, but let us at least think about how we can prepare our own small corner of it, this corner of 'literature', where we read, write, publish, recommend, denounce and give awards to books .   If we are to play an important role in this uncertain future, if we are to get the best from the writers of today and tomorrow, I believe we must become more diverse  .    I mean this in two particular senses .

In a time of dangerously increasing division, we must listen. Good writing and good reading will break down barriers .   We may even find a new idea, a great humane vision, around which to rally .
To the Swedish Academy, the Nobel Foundation, and to the people of Sweden who down the years have made the Nobel Prize a shining symbol for the good we human beings strive for – I give my thanks
.

...

The next generation will come with all sorts of new, sometimes bewildering ways to tell important and wonderful stories. We must keep our minds open to the m, especially regarding genre and form, so that we can nurture and celebrate the best of them.    In a time of dangerously increasing division, we must listen.      Good writing and good reading will break down barriers.     We may even find a new idea, a great humane vision, around which to rally.

nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/2017/ishiguro-lecture_en.html   - 7 dicembre 2017 - fb/ki - 8.12.2017

facebook.com/nobelprize  -  nobelprize.org/2017/ishiguro-lecture.html  -   https://youtu.be/ZW_5Y6ekUEw  -  facebook.com/nobelprize/videos   nobel lecture  -  7 dicembre 2017

.

... My Twentieth Century Evening and Other Small Breakthroughs is the lecture of the Nobel Laureate in Literature, Kazuo Ishiguro. A generous and hugely insightful biographical sketch, it explores his relationship with Japan, reflections on his own novels and an insight into some of his inspirations, from the worlds of writing, music and film. Ending with a rallying call for the ongoing importance of literature in the world, it is a characteristically thoughtful and moving piece.
amazon - 2017

.

so you endorse the choice of bob dylan last year
Of course! Yes. Bob Dylan has always been a hero of mine.     In many way, I think that’s the first time that I became interested in using words-in a very controlled way-was when I was thirteen years old, and I heard my very first Bob Dylan albums.     It's not one of the very famous ones, it was called ‘John Wesley Harding’.    But I was thrilled when he won the Nobel Prize last year, and I'm hoping that what it is  …   I’m hoping that he was given the prize not just for his words, but that it was a broadening of the idea of what literature was.    Because I think there are some very important works created by people like Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell, and many others. There is an art form that has grown up in the last several decades which I think is a very important art form.     And I think it deserves to stand alongside fiction, poetry, drama. It's got a large performance aspect to it, but it's, without doubt, some form of literature as well.    And, so, I think recognising Dylan as a Nobel Laureate in Literature, I think, is also a recognition of the importance of the actual whole art form that he represents.     Song-writing, and performing, it's become a very important thing for my generation, or the generations younger than me.    And I think it's great that the Swedish Academy recognise that.
www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld
- 2017

He's a writer of great integrity
Sara Danius - Secretary of the Swedish Academy

- PENSAVO FOSSE UNO SCHERZO ... POI HO VISTO I GIORNALISTI DAVANTI A CASA ED HANNO COMINCIATO A TELEFONARE   ...  L’AVESSI IMMAGINATO MI SAREI LAVATO I CAPELLI STAMATTINA !
.

- E' UNA NOTIZIA SORPRENDENTE E TOTALMENTE INASPETTATA ... ARRIVA IN UN MOMENTO IN CUI IL MONDO È INCERTO SUI SUOI VALORI, SULLA SUA LEADERSHIP E SULLA SUA SICUREZZA. SPERO SOLO CHE RICEVERE QUESTO GRANDE ONORE, ANCHE SE NEL MIO PICCOLO, POSSA INCORAGGIARE IN QUESTO MOMENTO LE FORZE DEL BENE E DELLA PACE .
.

- È UN GRANDISSIMO ONORE ... SOPRATTUTTO PERCHÉ SIGNIFICA CHE SONO SULLE ORME DEI PIÙ GRANDI AUTORI DELLA STORIA ...

It's a magnificent honour, mainly because it means that I'm in the footsteps of the greatest authors that have lived, so that's a terrific commendation.
.

la letteratura può davvero fare la differenza,  a livello politico-sociale,  nella società in cui viviamo ?
La mia più che altro è una speranza. E anche un'ambizione. Tutti noi abbiamo determinate responsabilità verso gli altri. Ma non mi è stato dato il Nobel per le mie idee politiche, bensì per la qualità del mio lavoro letterario.
cosa le resterà di questo giorno ?
L'enorme stupore. Ho sempre pensato che il Nobel venisse assegnato solo ai vecchi scrittori. Purtroppo oggi mi sono accorto che non sono più giovane.
lorenzo amuso - ilgiornale.it - 2017
.

ritiene che il nobel a dylan fosse meritato?
Certamente. E quasi mi vergogno ad averlo vinto io quest'anno al pensiero dei tanti grandi scrittori contemporanei che non l'hanno ancora vinto.    Mi piacerebbe che lo vincesse Salman Rushdie.    Mi piacerebbe che lo vincesse Haruki Murakami. Spero che tocchi a loro negli anni a venire.
sta scrivendo un nuovo libro?
Scrivo sempre, è il mio mestiere. Attualmente sono impegnato in un libro a fumetti, una graphic novel, e mi piace molto perché mi ricollega con i manga, dunque con quel Giappone che è parte di me.
enrico franceschini - repubblica.it - 2017  

.

facebook.com/nobelhuset/videos - KI & music - by Stacey Kent & Jim Tomlinson

.



 https://youtu.be/le-haX_J3yg
https://youtu.be/15Y-kks4zjo
www.facebook.com/BBCArchive/videos
https://youtu.be/DoGtQPks3qs
https://youtu.be/g1P6c3yomp0

- I COME IN THE LINE OF LOTS OF MY GREATEST HEROES . THE GREATEST AUTHORS IN HISTORY HAVE RECEIVED THIS PRIZE .

- I DO A VERY GOOD BOB DYLAN IMPERSONATION ! ... IT'S GREAT TO COME ONE YEAR AFTER BOB DYLAN, WHO WAS MY HERO SINCE THE AGE OF 13. HE'S PROBABLY MY BIGGEST HERO ...
.
- PART OF ME FEELS LIKE AN IMPOSTER AND PART OF ME FEELS BAD THAT I’VE GOT THIS BEFORE OTHER LIVING WRITERS ... I SUDDENLY REALISED THAT I’M 62, SO I AM AVERAGE AGE FOR THIS I SUPPOSE.
.
Like all egotistical writers, I like people to say: ‘Here is a world that is recognizably his'

HARUKI MURAKAMI
Murakami met Nagasaki-born British author Ishiguro in Tokyo more than 10 years ago ... They have deepened their friendship and spoken in English with each other.   

They have read almost all of each other’s novels.
In the commentary, Murakami mentioned that a charm of Ishiguro’s works was that Ishiguro has written different styles of long novels ...
- He is a thrilling and highly motivated creator who is always pursuing new themes - Murakami wrote.
the-japan-news.com -  fb/ki/hm - 2018

.

Herta Müller  -  nobel 2009

regista James Ivory 
Per me non è una sorpresa prima o poi avrebbe vinto
!
Sono felicissimo del Nobel, Kazuo Ishiguro è un amico vero e vorrei tanto tornare a lavorare con lui», esulta James Ivory da Firenze, dove ha partecipato alle celebrazioni del trentesimo anniversario del suo film più famoso, Camera con vista.    Il regista americano, classe 1928, aveva portato sullo schermo nel 1993 il romanzo dello scrittore giapponese Quel che resta del giorno, interpretato da un memorabile Anthony Hopkins nei panni del maggiordomo di un nobile conservatore inglese alla vigilia della Seconda Guerra  ...
gloria satta - messaggero

Scrive in inglese e si firma col cognome preceduto dal nome


Kazuo Ishiguro was born on November 8, 1954 in Nagasaki, Japan. The family moved to the United Kingdom when he was five years old; he returned to visit his country of birth only as an adult. In the late 1970s, Ishiguro graduated in English and Philosophy at the University of Kent, and then went on to study Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia.
Kazuo Ishiguro h as been a full-time author ever since his first book, A Pale View of Hills 1982. Both his first novel and the subsequent one, An Artist of the Floating World 1986, take place in Nagasaki a few years after the Second World War. The themes Ishiguro is most associated with are already present here: memory, time, and self-delusion. This is particularly notable in his most renowned novel, The Remains of the Day 1989, which was turned into film with Anthony Hopkins acting as the duty-obsessed butler Stevens.
Ishiguro’s writings are marked by a carefully restrained mode of expression, independent of whatever events are taking place.  At the same time, his more recent fiction contains fantastic features. With the dystopian work Never Let Me Go 2005, Ishiguro introduced a cold undercurrent of science fiction into his work.  In this novel, as in several others, we also find musical influences. A striking example is the collection of short stories titled Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall 2009, where music plays a pivotal role in depicting the characters’ relationships. In his latest novel, The Buried Giant 2015, an elderly couple go on a road trip through an archaic English landscape, hoping to reunite with their adult son, whom they have not seen for years. This novel explores, in a moving manner, how memory relates to oblivion, history to the present, and fantasy to reality.
Apart from his eight books, Ishiguro has also written scripts for film and television.
fb/nobelprize - 5.10.2017

il sindaco di Nagasaki Tomihisa Taue -  colpito dalle parole di ishiguro su nagasaki dopo la premiazione nobel -  conferma la cittadinanza onoraria della citta sud occidentale  .

2018
Upon receiving a medal and a golden cup, as well as the certificates, Ishiguro said, I thank you for all from the bottom of my heart.
Nagasaki and its citizens have kept alive throughout the years the memories of what happened in August 1945 … with a deep longing that such events never occur again anywhere on this planet ...
japantimes.co.jp - 2018

.

Sempre in bilico tra la cultura d’origine e l’ambiente occidentale in cui si è trovato a vivere, Kazuo Ishiguro deve probabilmente a queste sue stratificate radici culturali la capacità di innovare il romanzo britannico – e il formato letterario in senso lato – ricorrendo a elementi di generi normalmente considerati popolari ed estranei alla produzione letteraria occidentale più blasonata, che tuttora tende a rifarsi al modello del romanzo introspettivo o dell’affresco sociale-sociologico di matrice ottocentesca.
arte.sky.it

.

ishiguro usa parole nude, con le quali costruisce frasi di un’eleganza fredda e sofisticata. Dentro quelle parole si annida il piacere di un segreto travolgente e minuscolo; Ishiguro è uno scrittore che lascia in sospeso i sentimenti dei suoi personaggi e, sfruttando espedienti grammaticali e sintattici, rimanda il compiersi della vicenda ...
susanna basso - doppiozero - 2017
.
www.ibs.it/libri/autori/Kazuo%20Ishiguro  - www.amazon.com/Kazuo-Ishiguro  -   LIBRI
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazuo_Ishiguro
  -  BIO

https://thewire.in/218616/kazuo-ishiguro-door-nobel-websites-rather-strange-omission
.

at 34, Ishiguro's place in the literary firmament was already secure and he felt as if he'd only just begun
And then I had this most alarming realisation.    I looked at an encyclopaedia of literature and checked how old people were when they wrote their famous works. Pride and Prejudice was written by someone in her 20s. The Faulkner anyone remembers comes from his 30s. It goes on; Fitzgerald, Kafka, Chekhov; War and Peace, Ulysses. Dickens went on a bit longer, but his best work was when he was younger.    Of course there are exceptions but often, like Conrad, who was a sailor, there is some reason why they missed out on time earlier in their lives .   -ki
nicholas wroe - theguardian.com - 2005

.

I was then 32 years old, and we’d recently moved into a house in Sydenham, south London, where for the first time in my life I had a dedicated study.   - I’d written my first two novels at the dining table. -    It was actually a kind of large cupboard on the half-landing and lacked a door, but I was thrilled to have a space where I could spread my papers around as I wished and not have to clear them away at the end of each day .    I stuck up charts and notes all over the peeling walls and got down to writing .
KI - theguardian.com - 2014

.

.
were you a hippie?
I suppose I was, at least superficially. Long hair, mustache, guitar, rucksack. Ironically, we all thought we were very individual. I hitchhiked up the Pacific Coast Highway, through Los Angeles, San Francisco, and all over northern California. 
did you meet the queen mother?
Yes, quite regularly. Once she came round to our quarters, frighteningly, when there was only me and this other girl there. We didn’t know what on earth to do. We had a little chat, and she drove off again. But it was very informal. You’d often see her on the moors, though she herself didn’t shoot. I think there was a lot of alcohol consumed and it was all very chummy. 
chummy. 

was that the first time you were in a world like that?
It was the last time I was in a world like that.
do you have a writing routine?
I usually write from ten o’clock in the morning until about six o’clock. I try not to attend to e-mails or telephone calls until about four o’clock. 
susannah hunnewell - theparisreview.org - 2008

.

 

FOR ME THE ESSENTIAL THING IS THAT STORIES COMMUNICATE FEELINGS

THAT THEY APPEAL TO WHAT WE SHARE AS HUMAN BEINGS ACROSS   OUR BORDERS AND DIVIDES
KI on the power and meaning of stories - fb/nobelprize 2017

 

Forse c'è una immagine stereotipata della Sicilia e della mafia che proviene da film come Il Padrino, ma penso che per la maggior parte delle persone la Sicilia sia molto più di questo. Gran parte di quanti mi circondano, con cui ho la possibilità di confrontarmi, pensa ad una bella isola di cultura con una miscela di selvaggio e di sofisticato, con una ricca e propria storia, un travagliato rapporto con il continente d'Italia, che in qualche modo ricorda il rapporto tra l'Irlanda e la Gran Bretagna. La sorprendentemente ricca eredità letteraria ricorda proprio l'Irlanda.
.
So poco sugli autori italiani, ma quelli che ho letto tendevano tutti ad essere siciliani.   "Il Gattopardo" è, a mio avviso, il solo romanzo scritto in italiano che può affiancarsi ai grandi capolavori sociali realisti scritti in russo, francese e inglese. Lo collego ai grandi romanzi realisti del diciannovesimo secolo di Tolstoj, Eliot, Stendhal eccetera, e sono contento che non sia stato influenzato dal modernismo.
wikipedia

What is pertinent is the calmness of that beauty, its sense of restraint
the remains of the day


 

I’ve sometimes abandoned whole projects because she’s said :  No, this won’t do !
KI on the 'very deep influence' his wife Lorna has had on his work.
facebook.com/nobelprize/videos - fb/nobelprize


Quel che resta del giorno  -  scritto nel 1989 diventa film nel 1991
Appare sempre più probabile che riuscirò davvero ad intraprendere la spedizione che da alcuni giorni ormai tiene completamente occupata la mia fantasia. Spedizione, vorrei aggiungere, che intraprenderò da solo nella comodità della Ford di Mr Farraday; e che, a quanto prevedo, attraverso gran parte della più bella campagna inglese, mi condurrà fino alla costa occidentale del paese e riuscirà a tenermi lontano da Darlington Hall per cinque o sei giorni almeno. L'idea di un simile viaggio era nata, mi preme sottolinearlo, da una proposta delle più cortesi avanzatami da Mr Farraday in persona un pomeriggio di quasi due settimane orsono mentre spolveravo i ritratti in biblioteca.  E infatti, a quanto ricordo, mi trovavo in cima alla scala a pioli, intento a spolverare il ritratto del Visconte di Wetherby, allorché aveva fatto il suo ingresso in biblioteca il mio datore di lavoro il quale recava con sé alcuni volumi che presumibilmente desiderava venissero riposti sugli scaffali. Accorgendosi della mia persona, egli colse l'opportunità di informarmi di aver proprio allora definito il programma del suo rientro negli Stati Uniti per un periodo di cinque settimane tra agosto e settembre. Fatto questo annuncio, il signore depose i volumi su un tavolo, prese posto sulla chaise-longue e distese le gambe. Fu solo a quel punto che, fissando lo sguardo su di me, aggiunse:
- Spero sia chiaro, Stevens, che non mi aspetto che te ne rimanga chiuso in questa casa per tutto il tempo in cui sarò via. Perché non prendi la macchina e non te ne vai a fare un giro, per qualche giorno? A vederti hai tutta l'aria di uno che ha bisogno di una vacanza.
incipit

.

Ma questo non vuol dire, naturalmente, che non vi siano momenti di tanto in tanto – momenti di estrema tristezza – quando pensi tra te e te: “Che terribile errore è stata la mia vita”. E allora si è indotti a pensare ad una vita diversa, una vita migliore che si sarebbe potuta avere … Dopotutto ormai non si può più mettere indietro l’orologio. Non si può stare perennemente a pensare a quel che avrebbe potuto essere. Ci si deve convincere che la nostra vita è altrettanto buona, forse addirittura migliore, di quella della maggior parte delle persone, e di questo si deve essere grati … dobbiamo essere grati di ciò che realmente abbiamo. 

the remains of the day

it is hardly my fault if his lordship's life and work have turned out today to look, at best, a sad waste—and it is quite illogical that I should feel any regret or shame on my own account.

.

Indeed  -  why should I not admit it ?  -  in that moment, my heart was breaking .

.

The rest of my life stretches out as an emptiness before me .

.

What is pertinent is the calmness of beauty, its sense of restraint.   It is as though the land knows of its own beauty, it's own greatness, and feels no need to shout it .

.

What is the point in worrying oneself too much about what one could or could not have done to control the course one’s life took? Surely it is enough that the likes of you and I at least try to make our small contribution count for something true and worthy. And if some of us are prepared to sacrifice much in life in order to pursue such aspirations, surely that is in itself, whatever the outcome, cause for pride and contentment.

.

He chose a certain path in life, it proved to be a misguided one, but there, he chose it, he can say that at least. As for myself, I cannot even claim that. You see, I trusted.   I trusted in his lorship's wisdom. All those years I served him, I trusted I was doing something worthwhile.    I can't even say I made my own mistakes. Really - one has to ask oneself - what dignity is there in that ?
1989

.

.

.
il gigante sepolto
non le sembra che la memoria sia un patrimonio indispensabile per l'avvenire di un paese ?
Ogni comunità è selettiva con le proprie rimembranze. A volte scansarle aiuta a mantenere la pace. Per Il gigante sepolto ho pensato ai fatti accaduti in Bosnia, ma non solo. Ovunque si tende a sotterrare certi trascorsi, come hanno dimostrato le presentazioni del libro che ho fatto finora. In ogni paese il pubblico s'innervosiva riguardo a un'area del proprio passato .
leonetta bentivoglio - repubblica.it - 2015

THE BURIED GIANT

When it was too late for rescue, it was still early enough for revenge.
.

.

.
non lasciarmi . NEVER LET ME GO
Pensavo ai rifiuti, alla plastica che sventolava tra i rami, alla linea di strane cose intrappolate lungo il reticolato, e allora chiusi quasi gli occhi e immaginai che quello fosse il punto dove tutto ciò che avevo perduto dagli anni dell'infanzia era stato gettato a riva; adesso mi trovavo lì, e se avessi aspettato abbastan za, una minuscola figura sarebbe apparsa all'orizzonte in fondo al campo, e a poco a poco sarebbe diventata più grande, finché non mi fossi resa conto che era Tommy, e lui mi avrebbe fatto un cenno di saluto con la mano, forse mi avrebbe chiamata. La fantasia non andò mai al di là di questa immagine - non glielo permisi - e sebbene le lacrime mi rotolassero lungo le guance, non singhiozzavo né mi sentivo disperata ...

Mi chiamo Kathy H. Ho trentun anni, a da più di undici sono un’assistente. Sembra un periodo piuttosto lungo, lo so, ma a dire il vero loro vogliono  che continui per altri otto mesi, fino alla fine di dicembre. A quel punto saranno trascorsi quasi esattamente dodici anni. Adesso mi rendo conto che il fatto che io sia rimasta per tutto questo tempo non significa necessariamente che loro abbiano grande stima di me. Ci sono ottime assistenti a cui è stato chiesto di abbandonare dopo appena due o tre anni. E poi me ne viene in mente almeno una che ha operato per oltre quattordici, malgrado fosse un’assoluta nullità. Quindi non ho nessuna intenzione di darmi delle arie.
Ma per me significa molto, essere in grado di svolgere bene il mio lavoro, specialmente quando si tratta di mantenere «calmi» i miei donatori. Ho sviluppato una sorta di istinto nei loro confronti. So quando è il momento di essere presente e confortarli, quando lasciarli soli con se stessi; so quando ascoltarli, qualunque cosa abbiano da dire, e quando, con un'alzata di spalle, dirgli che è arrivata l'ora di darci un taglio.
Comunque sia, non voglio prendermi tutti i meriti. Conosco altre assistenti, in servizio in questo periodo, che sono altrettanto brave e non ricevono neanche la metà dei riconoscimenti che ricevo io. Se fossi una di loro, capirei un certo risentimento nei miei confronti - il monolocale in affitto, l'auto, e soprattutto il fatto di poter scegliere di chi prendermi cura. E inoltre sono una studentessa di Hailsham - che per alcuni è da solo motivo sufficiente per mandarli su tutte le furie. Kathy H., dicono, sceglie chi vuole, e sceglie sempre quelli come lei; quelli di Hailsham, o qualcuno che proviene da qualche altro posto privilegiato. Non c'è da stupirsi che il suo stato di servizio sia ottimo. L'ho sentito ripetere talmente tante volte che dovete averlo sentito dire anche voi, e forse in tutto questo c'è qualcosa di vero. Ma io non sono certamente la prima a cui viene concesso di scegliere, e dubito di essere l'ultima. E comunque ho fatto anch'io la mia parte prendendomi cura di donatori cresciuti in ogni dove. Tenetelo a mente: quando smetterò di fare questo lavoro saranno passati dodici anni, ed è soltanto negli ultimi sei che mi hanno permesso di scegliere.
 
E poi per quale motivo non avrebbero dovuto? Gli assistenti non sono mica degli automi. Fai del tuo meglio per ciascun donatore, ma alla fine le forze ti abbandonano. La pazienza e l'energia non sono risorse illimitate. Così, quando hai la possibilità di scegliere, naturalmente scegli qualcuno simile a te. È ovvio. Non sarei potuta andare avanti tutto questo tempo se non fossi riuscita a condividere con i miei donatori ogni singolo attimo della loro esistenza. E comunque sia, se non avessi cominciato a scegliere, come avrei fatto a riavvicinarmi a Ruth e a Tommy dopo tutti questi anni ?
 ...

Continuo a pensare a un fiume da qualche parte là fuori, con l’acqua che scorre velocissima.   E quelle due persone nell’acqua, che cercano di tenersi strette, più che possono, ma alla fine devono desistere. La corrente è troppo forte. Devono mollare, separarsi.   È la stessa cosa per noi. È un peccato, Kath, perché ci siamo amati per tutta la vita.   Ma alla fine non possiamo rimanere insieme per sempre  ...
Ciò che rendeva quella cassetta tanto speciale per me era una canzone in particolare, la numero tre, Never Let Me Go.
È un lento, musica d’atmosfera, tipicamente americano, e c’è quel verso che si ripete quando Judy canta:   Non lasciarmi ... Oh, tesoro … Non lasciarmi … Avevo undici anni allora, non avevo molta dimestichezza con la musica, ma quella canzone, be’, ne rimasi affascinata. Continuavo a riavvolgere il nastro esattamente nel punto dell’inizio, in modo da poterla ascoltare ogni volta che me se ne offriva l’occasione .

Never Let Me Go   .   a page-turner and a hearthbreaker, a tour de force of knotted tension and buried anguish - time

.

My name is Kathy H. I'm thirty-one years old, and I've been a carer now for over eleven years. That sounds long enough, I know, but actually they want me to go on for another eight months, until the end of this year. That'll make it almost exactly twelve years. Now I know my being a carer so long isn't necessarily because they think I'm fantastic at what I do. There are some really good carers who've been told to stop after just two or three years. And I can think of one carer at least who went on for all of fourteen years despite being a complete waste of space. So I'm not trying to boast  ...

Memories, even your most precious ones, fade surprisingly quickly.   But I don't go along with that. The memories I value most, I don't see them ever fading.

...

You have to accept that sometimes that's how things happen in this world. People's opinions, their feelings, they go one way, then the other. It just so happens you grew up at a certain point in this process.
...

When we lost something precious

and we'd looked and looked and still couldn't find it, then we didn't have to be completely heartbroken. We still had that last bit of comfort, thinking one day, when we grow up, and we were free to travel around the country, we would always go and find it ...

...

I keep thinking about this river somewhere, with the water moving really fast. And these two people in the water, trying to hold onto each other, holding on as hard as they can, but in the end it's just too much. The current's too strong. They've got to let go, drift apart. That's how it is with us. It's a shame, Kath, because we've loved each other all our lives. But in the end, we can't stay together forever.

.

.

.
Un pallido orizzonte di colline
Niki, il nome che finalmente demmo alla mia seconda figlia, non è un’abbreviazione, è un compromesso al quale giunsi con suo padre. Paradossalmente, infatti, chi voleva darle un nome giapponese era lui, e io – forse per l’egoistico desiderio che non mi richiamasse il passato – insistevo per un nome inglese. Alla fine il padre accettò Niki, pensando che avesse una vaga risonanza orientale.

A PALE VIEW OF HILLS

As with a wound on one's own body, it is possible to develop an intimacy with the most disturbing of things .

.

.

.  

a village after dark  
There was a time when I could travel England for weeks on end and remain at my sharpest—when, if anything, the travelling gave me an edge. But now that I am older I become disoriented more easily. So it was that on arriving at the village just after dark I failed to find my bearings at all. I could hardly believe I was in the same village in which not so long ago I had lived and come to exercise such influence.
There was nothing I recognized, and I found myself walking forever around twisting, badly lit streets hemmed in on both sides by the little stone cottages characteristic of the area.

The streets often became so narrow I could make no progress without my bag or my elbow scraping one rough wall or another. I persevered nevertheless, stumbling around in the darkness in the hope of coming upon the village square—where I could at least orient myself—or else of encountering one of the villagers.

When after a while I had done neither, a weariness came over me, and I decided my best course was just to choose a cottage at random, knock on the door, and hope it would be opened by someone who remembered me.
I stopped by a particularly rickety-looking door, whose upper beam was so low that I could see I would have to crouch right down to enter. A dim light was leaking out around the door’s edges, and I could hear voices and laughter. I knocked loudly to insure that the occupants would hear me over their  talk. But just then someone behind me said, 'Hello' ...
KI - newyorker.com - 2001

.

.

.

THE UNCONSOLED
Silence is just as likely to indicate the most profound ideas forming, the deepest energies being summoned.
1995

.

.

.
an artist of the floating world - un artista del mondo fluttuante

When you are young, there are many things which appear dull and lifeless. But as you get older, you will find these are the very things that are most important to you.
1986

.

fluttuante come Ukiyo-e, come Hokusai, Hiroshige, Utamaro, Utagawa – è ambientato nel Giappone del secondo dopoguerra. Il conflitto è terminato da poco e il Paese è duramente segnato, con la capitolazione simboleggiata dalla doppia terrificante esplosione nucleare su Hiroshima e Nagasaki. Il narratore e protagonista è Masuji Ono, pittore la cui fama è rapidamente e comprensibilmente mutata: ha infatti trascorso gli anni precedenti esaltando i valori imperiali. Un artista organico, quindi, come avrebbe detto Gramsci? Qualcosa di più. Perché, oltre a propagandare le idee del regime attraverso le sue opere, Ono è stato anche un informatore della polizia.
La figura stereotipata del pittore giapponese tradizionale, rigorosissimo in ogni suo gesto, solido nel solco della tradizione anche quando il mondo circostante muta con rapidità, viene pian piano, sul filo delle pagine, scalfito e messo in discussione. Ma con una strategia narrativa atipica: l’uso della prima persona, infatti, è costante, e queste scalfitture il lettore le percepisce attraverso i dubbi che si insinuano nei ragionamenti del narratore, nei giudizi che vede formarsi intorno e su di lui – e soprattutto nella ritrosia, nell’ottusità addirittura, con la quale Ono riconosce i propri errori.

marco enrico giacomelli - artribune.com - 2018

.

.

.

.

CROONER
NOCTURNES : FIVE STORIES OF MUSIC AND NIGHTFALL

Plenty of couples, they start off loving each other, then get tired of each other, end up hating each other. Sometimes though it goes the other way .
...

Deve uscirne ora, finché è in tempo.     In tempo per ritrovare l’amore, sposarsi di nuovo.     Ha bisogno di uscirne prima che sia troppo tardi .
crooner - 2009

.

.

.

It's all right -  I'm not upset

After all, they were just things.    When you've lost your mother and your father, you can't care so much about things, can you ?
when we were orphans - 2000

.
.
.

THE GOURMET

The Gourmet is set largely in a London church that offers a soup kitchen and overnight shelter for the city's tramps. The scriptural roots of its charitable mission are proclaimed on a plaque carrying a quotation from St. Mathew's gospel:
I was hungry and you gave me food   -   I was thirsty and you gave me drink   -   I was a stranger and you welcomed me.

www.npr.org/sections/about-eating-a-ghost    -   https://granta.com/the-gourmet-kazuo-ishiguro

.

.

.

When We Were Orphans

- TV has now become such an exciting way to tell stories – so much is possible – and I can’t tell you how thrilled I am about the company that gave us ‘Peaky Blinders’ developing my London/Shanghai 'detective novel'  -  said ishiguro  ...
Two other Ishiguro novels, The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, have been adapted into critically acclaimed movies. When We Were Orphans follows detective Christopher Banks as he unravels the mystery surrounding the disappearance of his parents during his childhood in Shanghai.
stewart clarke - variety.com - 2018 - fb/ki

.

.

.

La mia sera del ventesimo secolo e altre piccole svolte
In un'epoca di divisioni che crescono pericolosamente, è necessario che ci mettiamo in ascolto. La buona scrittura e i buoni lettori abbatteranno le barriere. Potremo perfino scoprire un'idea nuova, un progetto di grande umanità intorno a cui ritrovarci.
Nel conferire il Premio Nobel per la Letteratura a Kazuo Ishiguro, l'Accademia di Svezia ha riconosciuto la forza emotiva della sua scrittura e la sua maestria nello svelare il nostro illusorio senso di connessione con il resto del mondo. Nella lezione eloquente e schietta che ha tenuto a Stoccolma, e che qui pubblichiamo, Ishiguro ha riflettuto sul modo in cui la sua educazione lo ha formato e sui punti di svolta della propria carriera, «eventi marginali ... quiete scintille di rivelazione personale», che lo hanno trasformato nello scrittore che è oggi. Con la stessa generosa umanità che impreziosisce i suoi romanzi, Ishiguro guarda qui al di là di se stesso, al mondo che le nuove generazioni di scrittori stanno affrontando; e a ciò che significherà - e richiederà - adoperarsi perché la letteratura resti non soltanto viva, ma anche essenziale. Un testo di grande interesse sulla scrittura e sul divenire scrittori, da parte di uno dei romanzieri piú autorevoli della nostra generazione.
einaudi.it - 2018

ho voluto sottolineare in questa sede gli aspetti piccoli e privati della vita, perché in fondo di questo si occupa il mio lavoro. Una persona che scrive in silenzio in una stanza cercando di entrare in contatto con un’altra persona che in un’altra stanza più o meno silenziosa legge.

Una storia può divertire, insegnare qualcosa, a volte sostenere un punto di vista. Ma per me è fondamentale che trasmetta sensazioni. Che faccia appello a ciò che noi esseri umani condividiamo al di là di confini e divergenze.

Grandi e splendide industrie si ergono intorno alle storie: editoria, cinema, televisione, teatro. Ma alla fine tutto si risolve in una persona che dice a un’altra:

Questo è ciò che sento io. Riesci a capire quello che dico? È lo stesso anche per te?  -ki

ilpost.it - annalena benini_ilfoglio.it - 2018

.

.

.

Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star
Nobel Prize-winning British writer Kazuo Ishiguro will be among 140 foreign people recognized in this year’s spring decorations, the government said Sunday.
japantimes.co.jp - 2018
.
.
.
'sir ' kazuo ishiguro   -   Queen's Birthday Honours List
Author Kazuo Ishiguro said he is  ' proud of Britain, its open, democratic traditions and literary culture '    after being awarded a knighthood for services to literature less than a year after winning the Nobel Prize .     His acclaimed works include The Remains Of The Day for which he won the Man Booker Prize.
I'm deeply touched to receive this honour from the nation that welcomed me as a small foreign boy, that educated me and nurtured me ...
At this uncertain moment around our globe, I remain proud of Britain, its open, democratic traditions - and its wonderful literary culture in which I've been allowed to participate.

fb/ki - mirror.co.uk - 2018

1989 - Man Booker Prize per The Remains of the Day  - quel che resta del giorno

https://youtu.be/6tTGzHqrC98
1986 - Premio Withbread per Un artista del mondo fluttuante
2005 - premio Alex per Never let me go


kafka
è  lo scrittore che ha aperto molte possibilità, tecnicamente e tematicamente: noi romanzieri dovremmo prestargli più attenzione -  io ho cercato di farlo in molti miei lavori .

 

 

1  -  STORIA & winners

2  -  EVENTI LETTERARI

3  -  NEWS & ALTRO

 

2004/5/6  -  2007  -  2008/9/10  -  2011  -  2012   2013   -  2014  -  2015   2016   2017  - NOBEL LETTERATURA

 

home

 

nobelnewsletteraturanewsnobelnewsletteraturanewsnobelnews

 

 

PRIVACY